The Saga of Salt Suppression: Part II


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Music: “Salt” from I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate by The Vagabonds. Released: 1999.

Salt of the earth“,  “he’s not worth his salt“, “old salt“, “take it with a grain of salt“.  Salt is ubiquitous and ever-present.  We can’t live without it, but frequently, we cannot live with it either, if we consume too much.  How much is too much?  Well, over the years, the medical community has continually revised estimates about what represents a “healthy” daily dose.  It appears that for the average adult, about 500 mg is needed daily for the body to maintain some sort of saline equilibrium.  More than that is often unnecessary and often harmful.

Salt piles in Bolivia (Photo Credit: gethdimage.com.blogspot)

Salt piles in Bolivia (Photo Credit: gethdimage.com. blogspot)

The American Heart Association’s current recommendations are 1,500 mg daily, but some studies show that the average American adult consumes as much as 3,400 mg daily! 2,500 mg daily used to be the recommendation, but that seems to fluctuate depending on which source you consult for statistics.  According to Time Magazine, a study conducted in 2011 – 2012 suggested that the average daily sodium intake among US adults was an incredible 3,592 mg per day!, most of which comes from pre-packaged meals and processed foods.

This little girl is getting her salt ration! (Photo Credit: www.redditpics.com

This little girl is getting her salt ration! (Photo Credit: http://www.redditpics.com

If you think that is bad, “The Low Salt Diet and Recipe Book” (1982) indicates that the recommended adult diet should average 5,000 to 6,000 mg of sodium daily, which amounts to 8 teaspoons, from all sources.  This, coming from book entitled “The Low Salt Diet?”

"Monte Kali" in Hesse, Germany: 188 tons of salt! (Photo Credit: www.redditpics.com)

“Monte Kali” in Hesse, Germany: 188 tons of salt! (Photo Credit: http://www.redditpics.com)

So, why is there salt, in most cases a lot,  in just about every processed food we consume?    Michael Moss, author of “Salt, Sugar Fat:  How the Food Giants Hooked Us” suggests that sugar and fat in foods are indicators of high fat content, which our ancestors probably needed for survival, but since salt or sodium is necessary only in small amounts, he wonders why we love it so much.  It may be because it tastes good.  As a result, knowing our human foibles, food manufacturers have taken advantage of our affinity for salt and keep on adding it to processed foods at an alarming rate.  It wasn’t until 1991 that the food labeling we see today came into being.  Before that, you just took your chances and ingested sodium blindly.

Where most of our salt comes from (Photo Credit: www.medlineplus.com)

Where most of our salt comes from (Photo Credit: http://www.medlineplus.com)

Salt was used as a preservative historically, but that is scarcely the reason why today, a pressurized, sterilized can of green beans needs to have sodium injected into the mix.  In fact, most salt/sodium in canned foods is supposedly used to enhance texture and flavor, but not to act as a preservative.  Lower sodium and even no-sodium processed foods do exist, but as I have found out recently, they are not easy to find and it requires a fair amount of time and travel and a magnifying glass to do so! Take a look at some of these food labels from items in my pantry:

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As I indicated in “The Saga of Salt Suppression“, Part I, due to my spouse’s recent  issues, a low sodium diet was imperative (1,500 mg or even less if possible), along with fluid restrictions of 1,500 cc’s daily.  My 75 or so salts from around the world are currently gathering dust in a cupboard, reluctantly relinquished for the benefit of the health of my significant other. It is alarming to realize that in a mere teaspoon of  salt there lurks 2,325 mg of sodium, much more than the recommended 1,500 mg  and right up there with the total sodium ration for those who prefer to maximize their salt intake at 2,500 mg daily, FROM ALL SOURCES!

When we started on the sodium restricted diet, I looked through the comestibles in my pantry and in the fridge.  I was stunned to find out that a lowly 7 inch flour tortilla (a staple in the Southwest, and one that my husband frequently enjoys), has 460 mg of sodium!  Three tortillas for him and that would be his entire sodium limit for the day.  One of his favourite (ex-favourite) Saturday lunches was a can of pork and beans with added ketchup, and a hot dog wrapped up in a flour tortilla.  Read:  1,610 mg of sodium (and that was just for lunch!)

460 mg. of sodium in a lousy flour tortilla!

460 mg. of sodium in a lousy flour tortilla!

My husband and I rarely eat “out”, but as our 23rd Anniversary is coming up on Christmas Eve, I wanted to find a restaurant that offered low sodium options.  Well, good luck with that!  Restaurant chains, which have 20 outlets or more must now list nutritional values, on their menus.  Other restaurants can voluntarily offer this information, but few seem to do so.  While writing this post, I discovered some amazing information about what’s in that fast food hamburger or your favourite Red Lobster dish.  Below is just a small sample I picked:

Red Lobster 

  • Seaside Shrimp Trio (3,860 mg) (hefty, hefty, hefty!)
  • Walt’s Favorite Shrimp (2,730 mg)
  • Popcorn Shrimp (1,980 mg)
Red Lobster's "Seaside Shrimp Trio", with 3,860 mg of sodium! (Photo Credit: www.redlobster.com)

Red Lobster’s “Seaside Shrimp Trio”, with 3,860 mg of sodium! (Photo Credit: http://www.redlobster.com)

Outback Steakhouse

    • Slow Roast Prime Rib (12 oz) (1,420 mg)
    • New York Strip Steak (14 oz) (230 mg)
    • Chicken Tender Platter (1,620 mg)
    • Aussie Fries (410 mg)
Chicken Tenders from Outback Steakhouse: 1,620 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: www.outbacksteakhouse.com)

Chicken Tenders from Outback Steakhouse: 1,620 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.outback steakhouse.com)

Red Robin

  • Royal Red Robin Burger (2,150 mg)
  • Guacamole Bacon Burger (1,450 mg) (I’m guilty on this one!)
  • Reds Big Tavern Burger (1,640 mg)
  • Keep it Simple Burger (1,010 mg)
Red Robin's "Royal Red Robin Burger", with 2,150 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: www.redrobin.com)

Red Robin’s “Royal Red Robin Burger”, with 2,150 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.redrobin.com)

McDonald’s

  • Big Mac (1,010 mg)
  • McNuggets (4) (450 mg)
  • Egg McMuffin (850 mg)

    McDonald's Big Mac: 1,010 mg. of sodium (Photo Credit: www.hcbb.com)

    McDonald’s Big Mac: 1,010 mg. of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.hcbb.com)

Kentucky Fried Chicken

McDonald's Egg McMuffin is a mere 850 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: www.mcdonalds.com)

McDonald’s Egg McMuffin is a mere 850 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.mcdonalds.com)

  • Extra Crispy Chicken Breast (1) (1,230 mg)

Taco Bell

    • Bean Burrito (1,020 mg)
Taco Bell's "Bean Burrito: 1,220 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: www.tacobell.com)

Taco Bell’s “Bean Burrito: 1,220 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.tacobell.com)

Burger King

    • Whopper (1,020 mg)
Burger King's Whopper: 1,020 mg. of sodium (Photo Credit: www.burgerking.com)

Burger King’s Whopper: 1,020 mg. of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.burger    king.com)

Hormel, the makers of the infamous “Spam” have come out with numerous variations on a theme.  The original “Spam” contains 790 mg of sodium in a 2 ounce piece.

Original "Spam" contains 790 mg of sodium for one serving (Photo Credit: www.lawstreetmedia.com)

Original “Spam” contains 790 mg of sodium for one serving (Photo Credit: http://www.lawstreet media.com)

The “reduced sodium” version still packs in 580 mg.  Curiously enough, however, those same folks have managed to produce “Herb Ox”, which is completely sodium free chicken and beef bouillon in dry, packaged form.  Why they couldn’t do the same thing with “Spam”, I’m not sure.

"Reduced Sodium" Spam still packs in 580 mg of sodium for a 2 ounce serving

“Reduced Sodium” Spam still packs in 580 mg of sodium for a 2 ounce serving

There are millions of folks on restricted diets for one reason or another:  heart issues, diabetes, high cholesterol, etc. and some manufacturers are slowly starting to take notice. There are plenty of “salt substitutes” out there, and I have purchased about 6 or 7 of them recently.  Some, like “Mrs. Dash”, are not unpalatable, but are just lacking flavour, in my opinion, even though there are numerous varieties.  Some are downright horrible with a bitter, metallic taste.  One of the best I’ve sampled is “Table Tasty” by Benson’s Gourmet Seasonings, a small family run company out of Nevada.  They have a good selection of other seasonings and I am currently awaiting my “sampler” pack.   There are other places specializing in low sodium foods, and another one, which I ordered seasonings from is http://www.healthyheartmarket.com.  They have numerous offerings, including a low sodium soy sauce, “Chinatown Soy Sauce Dark”, which is pretty tasty.  Curiously enough, its manufactured in Jamaica.  It has only 145 mg of sodium per tablespoon, compared to most other well known brands, which weigh in at 800 to 1,000 mg or more for the same amount!

This "naturally brewed" soy sauce has 980 mg of sodium per 1 tablespoon!

This “naturally brewed” soy sauce has 980 mg of sodium per 1 tablespoon!

 

Alas, our occasional treat of a Papa John’s “The Works” pizza is now relegated to the black list.  Just one slice packs a whopping 1,013 mg!  And who can stop at just one?

Just one slice of Papa John's "The Works" pizza packs 1,013 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: www.papajohns.com)

Just one slice of Papa John’s “The Works” pizza packs 1,013 mg of sodium (Photo Credit: http://www.papajohns.com)

So, the moral of this whole dreary story is:  pay attention to food labels!  Your heart will thank you for it.

(Photo Credit: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

(Photo Credit: http://www.medicalnews today.com)


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Coming Soon: “The Saga of Salt Supression”

The current silence from The Vintage Cookbookery stems from a cascade of events concerning my primary taster, chief bottlewasher and spouse (all rolled into one!) In a nutshell, due to a series of recent, rather melodramatic medical events, he is now on a very restricted sodium diet, which is a definite shock to the man, who has carried a bottle of garlic salt in his pocket (with a backup bottle in his car) for 40 years! Needless to say, with 5,616 cookbooks on my shelves, the sodium information for recipes is negligible, even in cookbooks published in the past few years. More of that later, though. In the meantime, I am having to put my 80 or so salts from around the world in the back of the cupboard and am delving into the wonderful world of pseudo-salt (aka “Mrs. Dash”, which I think is tasteless and pointless!). Please stay tuned.

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The Pure Pleasures of Pummeling Pomegranate Pulp!

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Music – “Pomegranate Rag” from By Request by Matthew Davis. Released: 2016.

Ah…October in New Mexico.  Hundreds of hot air balloons, the rich and heady scent of roasting green chile and…pomegranates!  Their Latin name is Punica granatum, and they are thought to have originated in Persia and have been continuously cultivated throughout the Mediterranean.  Since the “many-seeded apple” thrives in a climate of low humidity and mild temperatures, pomegranates can be found in backyards throughout the Southwest.

"Russian Pomegranate"

“Russian Pomegranate”

At our current residence, we inherited two varieties:  “Wonderful” and “Russian“.  Depending on the species some pomegranates are borne on trees, but most species in the Southwest are more “shrubby”, including the two in our yard.

 

Our small harvest of pomegranates at our current residence (squirrel got the rest!)

Our small harvest of pomegranates at our current residence (squirrel got the rest!)

At our previous residence in the Northeast Heights part of Albuquerque, we also had a pomegranate tree, which after the first year we were there, bore a substantial quantity of fruit. After doing a little research about preparation, I elected to score the tough, leathery skin of the fruits, hold them under water (wearing gloves) and eject the seeds (arils), with some difficulty.  It was a laborious, messy job, tedious and with what I thought was very little reward.  After harvesting all of the arils, I had to decide what to do with them.  I decided to refrigerate some for use in cooking and thought I would make juice out of the rest.

But, how to juice?  Because of the large size of the seeds, surrounding by that red flesh, my blender quickly clogged and produced very little in the way of juice, also grinding up the seeds in the process, which was not very appetizing and made the juice bitter.  Necessity being the mother of invention, I put on my thinking cap and found a way to recycle the empty plastic bags from my favourite boxed wine!

Any large 5 litre boxed wine will do for the bags (I happen to like this one!)

Any large 5 litre boxed wine will do for the bags (I happen to like this one!)

After cutting off one corner of the bag (which is actually two bags:  a thinner one inside of the heavier liner), I inserted about a half a dozen small pomegranates.

Put about 5 or 6 small pomegranates into the wine bag. Seal it any way you can.

Put about 5 or 6 small pomegranates into the wine bag. Seal it any way you can.

At the time, I did not have the benefit of Foodsaver appliance, which I have now, so I used a substantial amount of duct tape to seal the opening.  Then, being ever resourceful, and with the assistance of my spouse, I carefully placed the bag under the rear tire of my car and gently rolled it back.  Presto!  Pomegranate juice! Although there was a small amount of leakage, I did manage to salvage most of it.  The bag, however, was a little the worse for wear and couldn’t be reused.

This year, I again saved the wine bags from the boxed wine, but had a slightly different approach.  After cutting off the edge of the bag, just large enough to put about 5 pomegranates inside, I now could get a tight seal on the open edge, using my Foodsaver machine.

Cut off one corner of the wine bag, large enough to insert a few small pomegranates

Cut off one corner of the wine bag, large enough to insert a few small pomegranates

Using the Foodsaver (or similar) appliance, I was able to seal the bag very effectively

Using the Foodsaver (or similar) appliance, I was able to seal the bag very effectively

Almost like new.  After taking the bag outside and wrapping it in an old towel, I took my trusty heavy-duty rubber mallet and began pounding away.

 

Place the bag on an old towel to absorb the blows and prevent the bag from becoming damaged. Pound away!

Place the bag on an old towel to absorb the blows and prevent the bag from becoming damaged. Pound away!

After pummeling for a few minutes, the juicy arils had given up as much as they were going to.

The contents of the bag after a few minutes of pummeling, ready to be drained.

The contents of the bag after a few minutes of pummeling, ready to be drained.

I clamped the bag to a piece of pegboard inside the garage and opened the spout, which is very easy to use.  A good, steady flow of juice emerged.  Afterwards, it is a good idea to have a helper squeeze out any remaining juice, while another pair of hands holds the valve open.

I clamped the bag on the edge of a pegboard, positioned over a plastic container to catch the juice.

I clamped the bag on the edge of a pegboard, positioned over a plastic container to catch the juice.

 

 

Opening the valve in the wine bag to let the juice flow out.

Opening the valve in the wine bag to let the juice flow out.

I was able to rinse out the pulp from the bag and reuse it after a little more trimming.  Not counting about 10 ounces I  reckon was wasted when my foot inadvertently kicked over the plastic container I had started to fill, I had about 50 ounces of juice and there are still about half a dozen fairly large pomegranates waiting for me to drain the contents of the next wine box!

 

Strain the juice to get out any bits of seeds

Strain the juice to get out any bits of seeds

The fruits of my labour!

The fruits of my labour!

 

 

Next was to find a recipe for Pomegranate Margaritas, which I did (several, in fact).  After a long (not really), hard (barely) day of pummeling pomegranate pulp, my husband and I were rewarded with the jewel-like glimmering of fresh Pomegranate Margaritas in the late afternoon sun in our courtyard, overlooking our goldfish pond.  Life just doesn’t get any better!

What could be better than fresh Pomegranate Margaritas on a late autumn day?

What could be better than fresh Pomegranate Margaritas on a late autumn day?

There are multiple recipes out there for Pomegranate Margaritas, but here is the one I used:

4 ounces tequila, 2 ounces Triple Sec, 1/2 cup fresh Pomegranate juice, juice of 1 to 2 limes.  In a cocktail shaker, shake with ice, strain, garnish with a lime wedge and serve (for 4, or 2 very thirsty people)

(Note:  pomegranate juice freezes well in either ice cube trays for small uses, or in jars.  Any boxed wine with a reclosable spout/bag will do, but the larger 5 litre boxes such as the one I used (Franzia), proved to be the best. Don’t put more than a half a dozen small or 3 large pomegranates inside, in order to give space for movement and to avoid blowing up the bag! Also, a great cookbook, which I have in my collection is “Pomegranates“, by Ann Kleinberg, published in 2004 by Ten Speed Press)

 

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It’s Time to do “The Albuquerque Turkey”!

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Music – “The Albuquerque Turkey” from Thanksgiving Songs That Tickle Your Funny Bone by Ruth Roberts. Released: 2015

NOTE: This is a repost of October 8, 2015

Well, readers, as you probably know, while you will be carousing and carrying on next Monday on Columbus Day, I will be celebrating Thanksgiving. That would be Canadian Thanksgiving, eh? Some have asked, why do Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving in October and not in November, like civilized people? Is it because in our perpetual goal to maintain our “Canadian-ness”, we just picked a different date to differentiate us from the Americans?

I'd hate to see the unfortunate outcome of this experiment! (Photo Credit: www.onceivegone.com)

I’d hate to see the unfortunate outcome of this experiment! (Photo Credit: http://www.onceivegone.com)

Actually, there are several thoughts on the subject, but the most common one suggests that the reason it occurs earlier than the US Thanksgiving is that because Canada is north of the United States (the Great White North, eh?), the harvest season occurs earlier. However, what most Americans don’t realize is that Canadians have been celebrating Thanksgiving since 1578, when explorer Martin Frobisher, after arriving in Newfoundland (that’s in Canada, eh?) held a ceremony of gratitude after surviving the long, treacherous journey from Europe. The Mayflower and the Puritans didn’t arrive in America until 1621. Another Canadian first!

Anyone who used to watch Julia Child cook will remember her dance with the turkey! (Photo Credit: www.thecookinmama.com)

Anyone who used to watch Julia Child cook will remember her dance with the turkey! (Photo Credit: http://www.thecookinmama.com)

The official Canadian Thanksgiving day was originally held in April, when, in 1872, Canadians celebrated the recovery of King Edward VII from a serious illness. The date was moved several times from the original April, to November and back to October.

Help...I've lost my legs! (Photo Credit: www.eatocracy.cnn.com)

Help…I’ve lost my legs! (Photo Credit: http://www.eatocracy.cnn.com)

In 1957 the Canadian Parliament finally settled on Thanksgiving to be celebrated on the second Monday in October, where it has remained ever since. The best part about being a Canadian living in the US? I get to celebrate in October and November (perhaps I’m eating more than my quota of turkey, though)

Kids, don't try this at home! (Photo Credit: www.vgscomputing.com)

Kids, don’t try this at home! (Photo Credit: http://www.vgscomputing.com)

One of the ever-present downsides of having Canadian Thanksgiving in Albuquerque, however, is the difficulty of finding fresh cranberries (not), or even frozen ones in early October. Once or twice, our local Albertson’s did have them in stock, but that must have been a fluke due to an early harvest. This year, I couldn’t even find a whole frozen turkey…. just some piddling little “turkey breast meat” things. I finally had to order one from a local meat/butcher, which cost me substantially more than my traditional Butterball or equivalent. So, now I have my “Albuquerque Turkey”, and even found music to match!

In the spirit of the season, enjoy the gallery of photos of turkey mishaps (not mine!), which I found. It will be your turn in November, so pay attention! But, beware! According to crop experts, there is likely to be a canned pumpkin shortage this fall, caused by heavy rainfall in the Midwest. So, think “Canadian” and run, don’t walk to your local supermarket and grab those cans of pumpkin now!

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Shall we Scrap the Silly Smear?

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Music – “The Frim Fram Sauce [Clean]” from The Wartime Years – Wartime Memories [Clean] by Nat King Cole. Released: 2011

Most of us would agree that we eat with the eyes and every good cook and chef knows this. An appetizing presentation on one’s plate goes a long way to stimulating the taste buds and makes one just want to dig in. However, I have one pet peeve (well, actually, more than one, but the rest don’t belong here in a blog about cookbooks and cooking!)

In so many of the more recently published cookbooks in my collection, the food photography is outstanding. There’s nothing like a gorgeous full-page photograph of a succulent dish, glistening, redolent with colour and laid out in a pleasing design to pull your eye (and your stomach) in. But (and here comes my pet peeve), I am so tired of seeing plates of beautiful food ruined with the seemingly ever-present, and evidently ever-popular “smear” of sauce!  It seems that almost every chef on The Food Network, The Cooking Channel and the rest of the food-related cooking shows utilizes the “smear” and it’s so pervasive, it’s become downright boring.

Various "smears" (Photo Credit: www.beyondthedough.ca)

Various “smears” (Photo Credit: http://www.beyondthe  dough.ca)

 

 

 

According to Chef Daniel Wilson of the Australian restaurant, Huxtable”, the sauce ‘smear‘ is a common technique. He explains: “To do one, place a spoonful of thickish sauce or purée on one side of the plate. Then turn the spoon over and place the back of the spoon into the middle of the sauce, then drag to the other side of the plate, or curve it like a comma in a quick but controlled manner.”

You call this a sauce?! (Photo Credit: www.afrotoast.wordpress.com)

You call this a sauce?! (Photo Credit: http://www.afrotoast. wordpress.com)

Not very appetizing, if you ask me! (Photo Credit: www.youtube.com)

Not very appetizing, if you ask me! (Photo Credit: http://www.youtube.com)

An "interrupted" smear (Photo Credit: www.lennardy.com)

An “interrupted” smear (Photo Credit: http://www.lennardy.com)

The "swoosh" smear (Photo Credit: www.blog.etundra.com)

The “swoosh” smear (Photo Credit: http://www.blog. etundra.com)

Whatever this is, it looks like it skidded across the plate (Photo Credit: www.theterrytable.com)

Whatever this is, it looks like it skidded across the plate (Photo Credit: http://www.theterrytable.com)

 

 

 

I have seen photographs of foods with plating sauces in lines (parallel or intersecting), droplets (randomly or in a specific pattern), pools, pulls (supposed to look like a shooting star), brushing or painting, foams, etc. For my taste, however, if you’re going to give me a sauce, then GIVE ME A SAUCE, not a measly “smear” on the plate! I want something I can dip into, pour over or smother my food in. I do not want a trace of what might have been, a glancing brush across my plate of something that is barely there.

Skidding strawberries (Photo Credit: www.eatwell101.com)

Skidding strawberries (Photo Credit: http://www.eatwell101.com)

"The Tadpole" smear (how tasteful) (Photo Credit: www.forums.egullet.org)

“The Tadpole” smear (how tasteful) (Photo Credit: http://www.forums. egullet.org)

 

Ladle on the sauce! (Photo Credit: www.en.wikipedia.org)

Ladle on the sauce! (Photo Credit: http://www.en. wikipedia.org)

Now, THIS is sauce! (Photo Credit: www.food.com)

Now, THIS is sauce! (Photo Credit: http://www.food.com)

 

 

 

Dish it up and forget the "smear"! (Photo Credit: www.shutterstock.com)

Dish it up and forget the “smear”! (Photo Credit: http://www.shutterstock.com)

No smears on this chicken! (Photo Credit: www.plateexpectations.org)

No smears on this chicken! (Photo Credit: http://www.plate  expectations.org)

This must be the minimalist approach to flan (Photo Credit: www.exilekiss.blogspot.com)

This must be the minimalist approach to flan and “smears” (Photo Credit: http://www.exilekiss. blogspot.com)

I’m not sure when the “smear” became so popular, or who popularized it, but frankly, I think it has overstayed its welcome and has been done to death. So, please chefs, can we scrap the “smear”?

 

 


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The Sad Saga of the Stolen Saturn (aka “The Cookbookmobile”)

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Music – “Who Stole My Car?” from And In This Corner… by DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince. Released: 1989

In Albuquerque, where on average 128 or more vehicles are stolen per week, I never thought I would be just one more “vehicle theft” pushpin on the crime map. Unfortunately, I was wrong.

On this past Tuesday morning, I set out for one of my favourite thrift stores, where I frequently find a good cache of used cookbooks to add to my collection.  I had been having some foot problems, so when I found a parking space in the first row, about 6 spots down, I was pleased that it was so close to the store entrance. As ALWAYS (!) I locked all of the doors and made sure all of the windows were closed: not even open a crack.

After 20 minutes of browsing, and having made my selections, I paid for my treasures and headed out into the parking lot, toting my stack of books. I proceeded in the direction of my car, but wait. The spot where I had parked my 1995 Saturn was now empty.

Not mine, but this is what the "cookbookmobile" looked like. (Photo Credit: www.curbsideclassic.com)

Not mine, but this is what the “cookbookmobile” looked like. (Photo Credit: http://www.curbside  classic.com)

Puzzled, I set my stack of books down on the curb and scratched my head. I knew it was in that spot 20 minutes ago. However, worried that early dementia had set in, I loped around the parking lot searching for my car, all in vain. It was GONE! Not a trace, not even any remnants of broken glass. Just GONE. My heart sank. After calling my spouse for support (and a ride home), I contacted the Albuquerque Police Department, who sent two pleasant officers a relatively short time later to get the details of the whole sordid event. They were not optimistic about its recovery. My spouse and I made additional scours of the parking lot, but there was not a Saturn in sight. I even made one more trek back later in the day, but nothing.

Not my Saturn, but this is frequently what it looked like inside! (Photo Credit: www.favim.com)

Not my Saturn, but this is frequently what it looked like inside! (Photo Credit: http://www.favim.com)

Prior to this, maybe 4 or 5 years ago, I came out of my former residence one cold February morning to go to work, and noticed that there was dusting of snow on the front passenger side of the car. I also noticed that it was very windy inside the car. The front passenger window had been smashed. Having read an article about vehicle theft in the USA a few weeks earlier, I felt pretty smug at having gotten off so easy. Both my spouse and I have always driven cars with manual transmissions, as we are more comfortable with them. The article I read, however, noted that these vehicles were among the least stolen on average for the simple reason that 59% of those individuals arrested for auto theft are under the age of 21. By common consensus, it seems likely that most in this age group had never even seen a manual transmission, let alone operated one. Thus I was feeling pretty confident that my Saturn was relatively safe from abduction.

Resembles the back of my Saturn on many a day (Photo Credit: www.lespetitesgourmettes.com)

Resembles the back of my Saturn on many a day (Photo Credit: http://www.lespetites gourmettes.com)

I purchased the vehicle when I first arrived in Albuquerque, from Toronto, in 1994 and its been with me ever since. Although cosmetically it looked a little tired, it had never been in an accident or otherwise sustained any damage, but it was clean, in excellent running condition, I had taken good care of it for 22 years, and it was mine.

If my Saturn had been as big as this, I could have collected cookbooks even faster! (Photo Credit: www.pinterest.com)

If my Saturn had been as big as this, I could have collected cookbooks even faster! (Photo Credit                          www.pinterest.   com)

You might be wondering what all of this has to do with my cookbook collection. Well, everything. When I began my first collection back around 1995, I had amassed somewhere in the neighbourhood of 1,500 books, almost all of them transported in my Saturn.  Due to an unfortunate set of circumstances, I felt I needed to part with them in 1999 and donated them to our local “Friends of the Library” (they promptly had a well advertised cookbook sale, at which time my spouse had to practically tie me up so that I wouldn’t attend and buy them all back).

(Photo Credit: www.linked.com)

(Photo Credit: http://www.linked.com)

 

Over the past 7 or 8 years, as I grew my second collection, my little Saturn rightfully earned the title of “cookbookmobile”, repeatedly hauling stacks of books from numerous thrift stores to my humble abode. Books in the front seat, books in the rear seats, books in the trunk, books on the floor, books in bags, books in boxes, loose books, my Saturn was there for me. Now it is gone. It just won’t be the same without my constant and long-serving cookbook-toting companion. Sigh.

(Photo Credit: www.youtube.com)

(Photo Credit: http://www.youtube.com)


My EatYourBooks cookbook collection

Posted in Collecting, Collections, Cookbooks, Cooking, Guinness World Records, New Mexico, Uncategorized, Vintage Cookbooks | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Conflict and Cookbooks: 1916 – 2016

CLICK ABOVE TO PLAY MUSIC

Music – “Concentration Camp” from Crime and Punishment (Documentary News Beds) by Stefano Torossi, Federico Arezzini. Released: 2015.

Many of the cookbooks published around 1916 and familiar to many housewives, reflected the times: WWI.  Cookbooks stressed economizing, not wasting food, limiting the use of certain foods that were essential to assist in the war effort, promoting a vegetable diet and such.  Reducing fried foods conserved fats, which were needed for other things. Eating fewer cakes and pastry conserved sugar, which was also essential for the troops. Smaller portions also conserved foods needed elsewhere and buying ‘locally’ (read “farmer’s markets”?) reduced the costs to ship food, therefore saving money needed for the war effort. It should be noted that during World War I, food conservation was strongly encouraged, however, there was no strict program of food rationing (that came later during World War II).

Back cover of "War-Time Cook and Health Book", 1917

Back cover of “War-Time Cook and Health Book”, 1917

A number of these booklets were produced not only the US government, but by food manufacturers and growers: “Canning and How to Use Canned Foods” by Bitting, A. W. ; Bitting, K. G., published by National Canners Association, Washington, D. C. (1916) and “A Mess Sergeant’s Handbook“, published by Procter & Gamble, 1916.  Overseas, “Allied cookery, British, French, Italian, Belgian, Russian”  by Grace Clergue Harrison and Gertrude Clergue, was also published in 1916.

"Allied Cookery"

“Allied Cookery, British, French, Italian, Belgian, Russian” by Grace C. Harrison and Gertrude Clergue, 1916

One of many wartime canning guides.

One of many wartime canning guides.

 

 

Other more recent books reflect war-time:  “The War-Time Kitchen:  Nostalgic Food and Facts from 1940-1954” by Marguerite Patten, published in 2004;  “Post-War Kitchen:  Nostalgic Foods and Facts from 1945-1954“, also by Marguerite Patten (2004);  “The Eat-Less Neat Book – War Ration Housekeeping” by C.S. Peel, published in 2010 and “Hungry for Peace:  How you Can Help End Poverty and War with Food Not Bombs“, by Keith McHenry, 2012.

"Hungry for Peace" by Keith McHenry

“Hungry for Peace” by Keith McHenry

"Wartime Kitchen" by Marguerite Patton

“Wartime Kitchen” by Marguerite Patten

 

 

 

 

However, not all cookbook publications of 1916 reflected the chaos of war.  Prominent among those published that year included “Boston Cooking-School Cook Book” by Fannie Merritt Farmer, “The Whys of Cooking” by Janet McKenzie Hill, “Cooking for Two“, also by Janet Hill, ” Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing Dish Recipes” by Marion Harris Neil, “The Capitol Cook Book, Adapted from the White House Cook Book, Containing Nearly 1,500 Choice, Tested Household Recipes” and “The Picayune Creole Cook Book: Fifth Edition“.

"The Boston Cooking School Cook Book" by Fannie Merritt Farmer, published in 1916

“The Boston Cooking School Cook Book” by Fannie Merritt Farmer, published in 1916

Historically, considering “traditional” wars (if there is such a thing), the USA has been fortunate in terms of “foreign” attacks on home soil and, fortunately, there have been few: in January, 1916, the Mexican, Pancho Villa,  angered over American support of his rivals for the control of Mexico, led an army of about 1,500 guerillas across the Mexican border and launched a brutal raid on the small American town of Columbus, New Mexico.  19 people were killed and the town burned.

The 1916 attack on American soil (Columbus, New Mexico), by Mexican, Pancho Villa.

The 1916 attack on American soil (Columbus, New Mexico), by Mexican, Pancho Villa.

 

On December 7th, 1941, the Japanese attached Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with a significant loss of life.  Of course, there have been other “scares”, among them the 1961 threat of the “Bay of Pigs”, involving the US and Cuba, which was, thankfully, averted.

Attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7th, 1941. (Photo Credit: www.wnyc.org)

Attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7th, 1941. (Photo Credit: http://www.wnyc.org)

 

 

According to Timothy McGrath, in 2014, the US was involved in 134 “wars”, “depending on your definition of “war”, on foreign soils.  But what is the definition of war?  after September 11th, 2001, then US Secretary of State John Kerry told CBS News that the US was “I think war is the wrong terminology and analogy but the fact is that we are engaged in a very significant global effort to curb terrorist activity…I don’t think people need to get into a war fever on this.  I think they have to view it as a heightened level of counter terrorist activity“. Whatever.

So, in 2016 and since at least the major events of 2001, the US is now being attacked at home, by “foreigners” or “home-grown foreigners”:  the World Trade Center in 1993 and 2001, Arlington, VA and Shanksville, PA, also in 2001,  Oklahoma City in 1995, the Boston Marathon in 2013,  San Bernardino, CA, 2015, and June, 2016, Orlando, FL.  This does not include attacks on US embassies abroad or military personnel abroad.  Call it “terrorism” or call it “war“, the results are the same.  But, what do cookbooks have to do with all of this?  Historically, many cookbooks are a sign of the times, as cookbooks published in the USA and Europe during both WW1 and WW2 often reflected.

For for one group of women during WW2  in Terezin (called, in German, Theresienstadt), while imprisoned in a concentration camp, they talked about the “dinners they made” and wrote down many recipes.  Their recipes and recollections have been compiled in a book, “In Memory’s Kitchen“, which has been referred to as “the dream cookbook, the cookbook of remembering“, a unique form of Holocaust literature.  Through their food memories they defended themselves against oblivion and struggled to fend off their loss of selves.  Through the book, they left a trace of themselves and their culture.

"In Memory's Kitchen: A Legacy from the Women of Terezin"

“In Memory’s Kitchen: A Legacy from the Women of Terezin” edited by Cara De Silva

Terezin concentration camp in Czechoslovakia during WW11 (Photo Credit: www.deathcamps.org)

Terezin concentration camp in Czechoslovakia during WW11 (Photo Credit: http://www.deathcamps.org)

Being herded into the concentration camp at Terezin, Czechoslovakia (Photo Credit: www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org)

Being herded into the concentration camp at Terezin, Czechoslovakia (Photo Credit: http://www.jewishvirtual library.org)

Other cookbooks published in the not too distant past, which reflect the wars in which their authors lived amidst include “The Bosnian Cookbook Project“, the efforts of 11 Bosnian refugees currently living in St. Louis.  The women, once strangers, met in a therapeutic group at the Center for Survivors of Torture and War Trauma. The center helps refugee and immigrants who have survived torture and war move toward healing and self-empowerment.

Bosnian women

Bosnian women in front of the mural, “Seeking Refuge” on the wall for Survivors of Torture & War Trauma, May, 2013, St. Louis (Photo Credit:  Laurie Skrivan)

Recipes aren’t common in the Bosnian culture, as most cooking skills are passed from mother to daughter in hands-on experiences. For Bosnian refugees in St. Louis, specialty foods remain one of the few tangible connections to their lives before the war.  The Bosnian Cookbook Project not only committed recipes to paper, but helped in the healing of these women, who had endured so much during the Bosnian wars in the early 1990’s.

The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey” by Laila El-Haddad and Maggie Schmitt,  is  a cookbook which serves as an introduction to daily life in the ongoing embattled Gaza Strip.

"The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey""

“The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey””

Share“, published by Women for Women International launched this cookbook to assist women in war-torn countries rebuild their lives.

"Share", published by Women for Women International

“Share”, published by Women for Women International

In 2003, as Iraq descended into civil war,  Annia Ciezadlo spent her honeymoon in Baghdad. For the next six years, she lived in Baghdad and Beirut, where she dodged bullets and watched Hezbollah commandos invade her Beirut neighborhood.  She subsequently wrote “Day of Honey:  A Memoir of Food, Love and War“, which focuses on rituals and food during wartime and her interactions with the people around her during that stressful time. Some recipes are included, although it is more a book about her journey through the hellish time of war and the symbolism of food during that journey.

"Day of Honey"

“Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love and War”

Interestingly enough, although a number of cookbooks were published in the US during WW1 and WW2, they focused on rationing, saving, economizing and reducing waste. Since that time, I cannot recall any cookbooks published, which reflected what was going on with US involvement on foreign soil, or the loss of American lives in those lands.  Of course, there were many cookbooks published by military personnel (or their wives), but even these don’t appear to reflect struggling to maintain a sense of the identity of a culture, nor were they cobbled together by groups of persecuted individuals in such wars.

I searched EYB (www.eatyourbooks.com), by publication year to pull up books in their database, which were published in 2002, after the horrors of September 11, 2001, in which 2,992 Americans lost their lives on home territory.  Besides the regular productions by Taste of Home, Sunset, Food & Wine, Williams-Sonoma, Bon Appetit, House & Gardens, Weight Watchers, etc.  I didn’t find any “sensitive” cookbooks reflecting the horrors of American involvement in wars anywhere, let alone on American soil. Mostly, it seems, America seems to be obsessed with cookbooks on weight management, eating healthy (low-fat, low cholesterol, no fat, heart healthy, paleo, vegetarian, vegan, flexitarian, ovolactovegetarian, etc.)  Plenty of cookbooks by “celebrity” chefs abound as well: Paula Deen, Bobby Flay, Cat Cora, Robert Irvine, Curtis Stone, Emeril Lagasse, just to name a few, not to mention the “old guard”, including Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, James Beard, and more.  All America and Apple Pie.

It seems to me that cookbooks published in America really are a reflection of our culture and our times: we are relatively safe and are more or less insulated to a great degree from the horrors that people in other continents and countries endure, some on a daily basis.  Although “terrorism” has reared its ugly head in this country, the occurrences are spotty, perpetrated here and there on numerous civilians by evil beings in order to maim, kill and frighten us. While horrific, they are carried out speedily and instantaneously. But, do they stop the daily routine for most of us?  Do they gather us together in a common cause to publish a cookbook that will preserve our persecuted culture and loss of life and identity?  It doesn’t seem so to me. I hope that we will never have to “band together” in this manner.


My EatYourBooks cookbook collection

Posted in Bosnia, Comfort Food, Cookbooks, Cooking, Cooking and Social History, Food Trends, Guinness World Records, New Mexico, Prison Meals, Uncategorized, Vintage Cookbooks | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Cautionary Commentary Concerning Cookbook Collecting

CLICK ABOVE TO PLAY MUSIC

Music – “The Collector” from The Collector by Maurice Jarre

Since I began my second cookbook collection, I have slowly and meticulously grown the collection over the period of several years. When the “official” count was conducted in July, 2013, there were 2,970 cookbooks, which garnered the Guinness World Record for the largest collection of cookbooks. Now, three years later, “we” are at 5,374 (unofficial).

Just before the BIG count in July, 2013. The subject has altered the photo to protect her identity for security reasons (!)(Original pre-altered photo credit: Marla Brose/Albuquerque Journal)

Just before the BIG count in July, 2013. The subject has altered the photo to protect her identity for reasons, which will become obvious (!)(Original pre-altered photo credit: Marla Brose/Albuquerque Journal)

"Are you sure she said there were 500 boxes of cookbooks? Nobody has that many cookbooks" (Photo Credit: www.dreamstime.com)

“Are you sure she said there were 500 boxes of cookbooks to move? Nobody has that many cookbooks” (Photo Credit: http://www.dreamstime.com)

Terence Stamp (Frederick) in the movie “The Collector” (released in 1965) played a lonely, unbalanced young man who stalks, kidnaps, and imprisons a pretty, young art student, Miranda, played by Samantha Eggar. One day, after following her in his van, Frederick kidnaps and chloroforms Miranda, locking her in the windowless stone cellar that he has prepared with a bed, some furnishings, and an electric heater. Frederick is a butterfly collector and treats Miranda as if she is one of his specimens.  

Terence Stamp and Samantha Eggar in "The Collector". He is described as (Photo Credit: www.british60scinema.net)

Terence Stamp and Samantha Eggar in “The Collector”. He is described as “…lonely & unbalanced”  (Photo Credit: http://www.british60s cinema.net)

After struggling to escape, to bargain with him, seduce him, etc. the young Miranda finally has the opportunity to bash Frederick in the head with a shovel. Unfortunately, it was in vain, as Frederick, just wounded, recaptures her and tosses her into the cold, wet cellar (the heater was broken during the fight). After being locked in the cold, wet cellar for 3 days, Miranda dies.

So, what does this say about the collector of cookbooks? Am I lonely? (I don’t think so) Unbalanced? (Certainly not!).  Indeed, my cookbooks are prisoners, and are at my whim, however, I do not mistreat or abuse them and they really are in a good place.

A year and a half ago, when the count was approximately 4,600 books, they overwhelmed my small home and forced me into larger quarters (so, who is in control here?) The old saying, “If you build it, they will come” is true. Since moving to my larger home, “they” kept on coming, to the tune of 774 additions since my move in January, 2015. Despite the joy they bring me, and my spouse, who is the recipient of all of those recipes in all of those cookbooks, there are drawbacks. Here is my cautionary tale about collecting cookbooks on a large-scale:

1) Depending on the size of your collection and your devotion (passion? fetish?), they will continue to accumulate in your abode, despite your promises to cut back or stop (When I had about 1,800 cookbooks I “promised” my spouse that I would stop when I reached 2,000. Well, we can see that my nose is very long, like Pinocchio).

Like Pinocchio, I told an "untruth", when I promised my spouse that I would stop collecting cookbooks, when I reached the 2,000 mark (the rest is history) (Photo Credit: www.dreamstime.com)

Like Pinocchio, I told an “untruth”, when I promised my spouse that I would stop collecting cookbooks, when I reached the 2,000 mark (the rest is history) (Photo Credit: http://www.dreams      time.com)

2) Eventually, if you are unable to control your addiction, you will have to move. (there is no “Cookbooks Anonymous” that I am aware of, but perhaps I should start a chapter).

3) Moving 4,600 cookbooks is very stressful: on the back, the legs, the hips, and everything in between, including your patience (more so for your spouse) and sanity. You will question why you are doing this and will be unable to come up with a logical answer.

"Yes, we really are going to move all of these books, but only once!" (Photo Credit: www.journaltimes.com)

“Yes, we really are going to move all of these books, but only once!” (Photo Credit: http://www.journaltimes.com)

In addition, if you plan to move around Christmas or New Years (which we did), you will be banned from local wine stores for filching hundreds (yes hundreds!) of empty boxes from their loading bays after making dozens of raids. They will blacklist you until after the holiday rush is over, when the need for boxes subsides.

If you plan to move over a holiday, count on being blacklisted from your local wine store for relieving them of too many boxes. (Photo Credit: www.123rf.com)

If you plan to move over a holiday, count on being blacklisted from your local wine store for relieving them of too many boxes. (Photo Credit: http://www.123rf.com)

4) You are now faced with an even bigger dilemma. With the extra space in your new abode for more bookcases, you will feel compelled to fill them up, so your collection will grow exponentially, as empty shelves are so sad to look at.

 

Bookcases not filled with cookbooks are very sad to look at. You feel compelled to fill them up. (Photo Credit: www.bobvila.com)

Bookcases not filled with cookbooks are very sad to look at. You feel compelled to fill them up. (Photo Credit: http://www.bobvila.com)

5) People will call you or e-mail you out of the blue, after hearing about your collection and will try to sell you books that you already have, don’t want, or are by cookbook authors you can’t stand. Anyone who checks my “virtual” bookshelves at http://www.eatyourbooks.com (EYB), “manycookbooks” has no cookbooks from Paula Deen, Martha Stewart, Rachel Ray, Alton Brown, and with the exception of one as a gift, no others from Emeril Lagasse. We all have our favourites and we all have our pet-peeves in chefs. On the other hand, occasionally, people will call and donate their old unwanted cookbooks to “a good home”, which is very generous.

6) People will think you are nuts. The truth hurts. Some people think you’re secretly a hoarder, but don’t listen to them. Hoarders just hoard to do it and don’t care about the items they hoard. My “hoard” is neat, organized, temperature controlled and not dangerous.

Many people will regard you as nuts for collecting so many cookbooks (ignore them) (Photo Credit: www.enwikipedia.org)

Many people will regard you as nuts for collecting so many cookbooks (ignore them) (Photo Credit: www. enwikipedia.org)

This is hoarding. I do not hoard. My cookbook collection is neat and not dangerous at all (unless a bookcase should tip over) (Photo Credit: www.c2cbigruel.com)

This is hoarding. I do not hoard. My cookbook collection is neat and not dangerous at all (unless a bookcase should tip over) (Photo Credit: http://www.c2cbigruel.com)

 

 

 

 

7) People will ask you if you actually cook. Now, while it is true that I read cookbooks as other people read fiction, I really do use those recipes.

Yes, I even cook using the cookbook recipes! (Photo Credit: www.dreamstime.com)

Yes, I even cook using the cookbook recipes! (Photo Credit: http://www.dreams   time. com)

8) People will make comments such as “well, I have 10,000 cookbooks” so what’s the big deal about her 2013 Guinness World Record of 2,790?  I respond by saying it’s like the lottery: you can’t win if you don’t buy a ticket. The good folks at Guinness don’t know you’re out there unless you tell them and follow their rules. So, go for it and stop whining already!

See. People in US collect things that are a lot more bizarre than cookbooks. I mean....... (Photo Credit: www.newscastic.com)

See?  Is “Largest Cookbook Collection” any more bizarre than “Most people hugging trees” or “Largest Hokey Pokey? Really? (Photo Credit: http://www.newscastic.com)

9) Despite your careful collecting, organizing and maintaining your collection and cookbook database, you will still be unable to find a book you are looking for to use that “just right” recipe. Eat Your Books is a big help here, but even then, if you can’t find the book on the shelves, you’ll be tearing your hair out.

10) Bookcases and the weight of the books on them will crush your carpets beyond recognition. If you ever plan to move again (!!), also plan on replacing your carpets in your old house and hook up with a good chiropractor (I did both).

If you think this is bad from a table, think about what 8,000 + cookbooks can do to it! (I speak from experience) (Photo Credit: www.ehow.com)

If you think this is bad from the weight of a table, think about what 8,000 + pounds of cookbooks can do to it! (I speak from experience) (Photo Credit: http://www.ehow.com)

Regular readers might have come across my post of September 22nd, 2014 “A Vintage Cookbookery Mystery: What do Pachyderms and Cookbooks have in Common ?” Well, the cookbook collection at that time weighed in at approximately 8,900 pounds, the average weight of an African elephant. Now, see what I mean about your carpets! (Photo Credit: www.gettyimages.com)

Regular readers might have come across my post of September 22nd, 2014 “A Vintage Cookbookery Mystery: What do Pachyderms and Cookbooks have in Common ?” Well, the cookbook collection at that time weighed in at approximately 8,900 pounds, the average weight of an African elephant. Now, see what I mean about your carpets! (Photo Credit: http://www.gettyimages.com)

So, there you have it. All the down and dirty on cookbook collecting. Now get out there and check out those thrift stores and don’t be bullied or intimidated by non-cookbook lovers!

 

 

 

When it's all over...(Photo Credit: www.canstockphoto.com)

When it’s all over…(Photo Credit: http://www.canstock photo.com)


My EatYourBooks cookbook collection

Posted in Collecting, Collections, Cookbooks, Cooking, Cooking and Social History, Cooking Technology, Food Trends, Guinness World Records, New Mexico, Uncategorized, Vintage Cookbooks | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“I Say, Old Chap – Do Not Huckle-my-Buff and Kindly Stop Playing with your Chappit Tatties!”

CLICK ABOVE TO PLAY MUSIC

Music – “Rule Britannia” from Elgar Variations by Brass Band Willebroek & Raf Van Looveren. Released: 2007

This might be considered a sequel to “Stargazey Pies and Stinking Bishops– Oh, Those Wonderful Brits!“, which I posted on March 5th, 2014, although it’s hard to top “Stargazey Pies and Stinking Bishops”, for sure.  Nonetheless, my recent acquisition of “British Cookery – A Complete Guide to Culinary Practice in the British Isles“, edited by Lizzie Boyd, and published in 1976 by British Tourist Authority and the British Farm Produce Council presents a virtual cornucopia of recipes in that great British tradition of being nearly unfathomable to figure out by title alone.

"Stargazey Pie" (Photo Credit - www.en.wikipedia.org)

“Stargazey Pie” (Photo Credit – http://www.en.wikipedia.org)

If you were not born and bred in the UK, or have spent a substantial amount of time there, many of the recipe titles in this book would stymie you (as they did me).  Now, it is true that every culture and language has its’ own lexicon for cookery and recipe names, but the British have always taken it that extra mile to the amusement and delight of the rest of the culinary world.  Part of reading a cookbook published in the UK is just to read the names of the recipes and attempt to determine exactly what it is, what the ingredients are, and would you serve it to guests.

This wonderful cookbook presents not only hundreds of recipes (noting which area or county they are associated with), but also gives a history of recipes by region, including London, South East, Rural South, West Country, East Anglia, North Midland, Midlands, Wales, North West, North, Scotland, Borders, Central Lowlands, Highlands, North East, Orkney and Shetland, Outer Hebrides, Channel Islands and Northern Ireland.   For example “Clotted Cream” (Devonshire), “Bosworth Jumbles” (Leicestershire), or “Cropadeau” (Outer Hebrides).    In addition, there is a section about what was cooked historically by “class“. For example, in “Class I – Working Class“, the dependence was clearly on bread, butter and tea.  For “Class II – Lower Middle Class Family“, a greater variety of foods was featured, including tinned meats and fish, cheap jam and the traditional boiled mutton and onion sauce.  The “Middle Class” might enjoy “luxury” foods including fried bacon and eggs, marmalade, Rissoles, stewed rhubarb, sausages, potted meat, and custard.   Interestingly, each recipe is also designated with either an “H” (Hotel/Commercial) and/or “F” (Family/Domestic).

So, you can Huckle-my-Buff with your Muggety Pie, but don’t forget the Saffron Wigs.  Are your Priddy Oggies able to stand up to the Pitchy Cake, and will the Hough and Dough become Baps?  Don’t forget that the Stanhope Firelighters might get in an Inky Pinky over Love in Disguise and the Poor Knights of Windsor might not fare very well against the battle with the Figgie Hobbin.  If you insist on playing with your Chappit Tatties, don’t say you weren’t forewarned:  without Brotherly Love, they might end up as a Moggy, or worse, Twice Laid!

Oh, that Yellow Man would have to contend with Dunmow Flitch, or worse, deal with the Feather Fowlie and the encroaching Bawd Bree.  In the kitchen, all hell might break loose if Huffkins met up with Powsowdie, and if Fidget Pie lived up to its’ name, there might be a Whim Wham or a Fitless Cock to contend with!  Crubins and Panackelty begone or Boodle’s Cakes might melt into Leeky Stew with a Nackerjack (not a pretty sight).  For heavens’ sake, don’t ever let your Brumbrays get near the Rumfustian, or a Crockie Pie may be the unfortunate result.  When all is said and done, however, remember that your Peebles Sour Plooms might turn on you (they have a reputation of doing that), but if all else fails, run a quick Teisen Lap and then settle into a nice Tweed Kettle.

For those non-Brits, translations are below (the list is sorted by appearance in the text above):

Huckle-my-Buff                                                                                                                             Also known as “Huckle-my-butt” and “Huckle-and-buff”, it is an early 18th century hot beverage combining gin or cognac and beer.
Muggety Pie                                                                                                                                     A meat pie, traditionally made in Cornwall, England.  The contents are usually offal (stewed intestines).  The word “Muggots” meant pig intestines, sometimes calf.
Saffron Wigs
(London)  Yeast rolls made using saffron water, caraway seeds, etc.
Priddy Oggies
(Somerset) A savoury pie. A variation of “Tiddy oggie”, which means potato pastry.  The recipe probably originated after the depression caused by the closure of tin mines in Cornwall.
Pitchy Cake
A yeast cake from Cornwall.  Probably so named for the action of “pitching” currants, sugar and fat into bread dough.
Hough and Dough
Pork scraps, such as hock or rib meat, with sliced potato, onion, stock and herbs baked in a dish the sides and part of the base of which are lined with suet pastry. 
Baps
A bread roll.  A tender pillow of dough made with milk, lard and butter.
Stanhope Firelighters
(Durham)  Biscuits made of rolled oats, margarine and white or a combination of white and brown sugar.
Inky Pinky
(Scotland) A dish of left-over beef with sliced carrots and gravy.  Possibly named because of the colour of undercooked beef.
Love in Disguise
(Herefordshire) Baked stuffed calf heart with a bread crumb and vermicelli coating.

Poor Knights of Windsor                                                                                                        A dish that is very similar to French Toast. Unlike French Toast, however, in making Poor Knights of Windsor you don’t mix the eggs and milk together. Sugar and sherry are stirred into a shallow dish of milk. Egg yolks are used (not whole eggs.)
Figgie Hobbin                                                                                                                        (Cornwall) A biscuit made with chopped suet, figs and milk.
Chappit Tatties                                                                                                                                      (Scotland) Mashed potatoes
Brotherly Love
Also known as Brotherly Lardy, or Lardie Cake.  Bread dough roll, dabbed with lard and rolled into a pin-wheel, sprinkled with sugar and baked.
Moggy                                                                                                                                               A biscuit, which may be made with black treacle and ground ginger instead of syrup.
Twice Laid                                                                                                                                       (Kent)  The local name for these cod-fish presumably refers to the fact that the leftover cooked cod is used in the dish.
Yellow Man                                                                                                                                     (Ireland)  A confectionary made with butter, brown sugar and golden syrup.
Dunmow Flitch                                                                                                                               Dunmow Flitch is not a dish, but a side (flitch) of bacon, awarded on Whit-Monday every 4 years.  After a light-hearted “trial” and great ceremony, it is given to a married couple who can swear that they have neither quarrelled or repented their marriage for one year and one day.
Feather Fowlie                                                                                                                                (Scotland).  A soup with ham, chicken, celery, onions, etc. and said to have been a favorite of Mary, Queen of Scots.
Bawd Bree                                                                                                                                       (Scotland)  Hare soup.
Huffkins                                                                                                                                            (Kent)  A traditional flat bread roll with an indentation made by the baker’s thumb.  The “hole” might be filled with cherries or jam and topped with whipped cream.
Powsowdie
(Scotland)  A meat soup (sheep’s head broth).  Pow means “head” and “sowdie” a popular boiled Sunday dinner dish.
Fidget Pie                                                                                                                                       (Shropshire)  A savoury pie with bacon, onions and apples.  “Fitched” means five-sided.
Whim Wham                                                                                                                                 (Scotland)  A fool consisting of cream, white wine and sugar, over sponge fingers with a layer of jelly on top and garnished with crystallized lemon or orange slices.
Fitless Cock                                                                                                                                     (Scotland)  Offal (“Dry Goose”).  A mealie pudding made with lightly beaten eggs, which are moulded into the shape of a chicken, wrapped in cloth and boiled.
Crubins                                                                                                                                             (Ireland)  Pigs trotters
Panackelty                                                                                                                                       (Durham)  A family dish of leftover cooked bacon, which is brought to the table in the dish in which it was cooked.
Boodle’s Cakes 
Soda-raised white wheat flour cake of 1 lb. flour, 8 oz butter, 8 oz chopped raisins, 2 eggs, sugar and cream.

Leeky Stew with a Nackerjack                                                                                                 (Devon)  “Nackerjack” is a dumpling, in this case made of leeks, potatoes, streaky bacon and pastry.
Brumbrays                                                                                                                                     (London)  Rolled fileted slices of veal in a brown sauce.
Rumfustian                                                                                                                                           A hot beverage composed of strong beer, wine, gin, egg yolks, sugar, and spices.
Crockie Pie
(Also “Crocky Pie”) A stew made of meat, turnips, potatoes and onions, covered with a thick layer of dough the same diameter of the “crock” or saucepan in which the stew is cooked.
Peebles Sour Plooms
(Scotland)  Scottish for “sour plum”, which is a sharp flavoured, round, green boiled sweet. They are sold loose by weight in paper bags, traditionally in “quarters” (a quarter of a pound)
Teisen Lap                                                                                                                                       (Wales)  A cake made of sugar, currants and milk.
Tweed Kettle
(Edinburgh) A salmon stew, subtly flavoured and made with a left over tail-piece of salmon.
Tatws A Cig Yn Y Popty                                                                                                              (Wales)  Boneless lamb with onions and potatoes, usually served with creamed carrots or swedes.  A loose English translation is “potatoes and meat in the oven”.               

                 

A final word of advice:

Tatws A Cig Yn Y Popty and don’t you forget it!
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                                                                    

                                                                                                                                            

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                                     


My EatYourBooks cookbook collection

Posted in Collecting, Cookbooks, Cooking, Cooking and Social History, Food Trends, Guinness World Records, Recipes, Uncategorized, Vintage Cookbooks | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Only in Canada, Eh? Pity

CLICK ABOVE TO PLAY MUSIC

Music – “Eh Canada” from Rick Around the Rock by Rick Scott. Released: 2010

In honour of Canada Day, today, July 1st, which marks 149 years since Confederation, I am re-posting this post from March, 2014.  Happy Canada Day, eh?!

By now, anyone who has been following my posts will have noted my insistence upon using the Queen’s English, which is what I learned growing up in Southern Ontario, Toronto, to be specific. You know what I mean, our habit of spelling labor as “labour” and center as “centre”. However, contrary to popular belief, we don’t pronounce “out and about” as “oot and aboot”, despite what some Americans will tell you. It’s just envy and if you practice long and hard, you too can learn to say “oot and aboot”, although I don’t know why you would want to. Also, contrary to popular belief, not all Canadians love hockey (I have always been totally disinterested), we aren’t all polite (I know some very rude Canadians) and we don’t end every sentence with “eh” (when we know there are tourists around, we make an effort to humour them, though).

Canadians have a reputation for being polite (Photo Credit: www.dumpaday.com)

Canadians have a reputation for being polite (Photo Credit: http://www.dumpaday.com)

Winter is NOT all year round and most of us don’t live in igloos. It took me years of living in Albuquerque to consciously ask where the location of the “restroom” was as I drew blank looks when asking for the “washroom”. It was also traumatic to have to spell my surname “Jimenez” routinely as I had to force myself to remember to say “zee” and not “zed” as I was accustomed to.

Rick Moranis & Dave Thomas, of SCTV in 1980. Their "Great White North" introduction always began with "Gday, eh?" (Photo Credit: en.wikipedia.org)

Rick Moranis & Dave Thomas, of SCTV in 1980. Their “Great White North” introduction always began with “Gday, eh?” (Photo Credit: en.wikipedia.org)

There is a general misunderstanding about Canadian cuisine. In writing this post, I was surprised and amused to find a number of internet references asking “what do Canadians eat?” or “do Canadians eat beaver and moose?” (not routinely – we prefer Subway sandwiches and Papa John’s Pizza when we’re too tired to cook after mushing home from the office on our dogsled). Canadian cuisine is an eclectic mixture of many cultures and our food reflects this. In the 2011 Canadian Census, Canadians identified themselves as “belonging” to the following groups: French, Scottish, Irish, German, Italian, Chinese, North American Indian, Ukrainian, Dutch, Polish, East Indian, Russian, Arabs, Welsh, Filipino, Norwegian, Portuguese, Metis, British, Swedish, Spanish, American, Hungarian, Jewish, and Greek. The list is not inclusive, however. No wonder our food is so diverse and all the better for it !

When I left Toronto (actually Mississauga, which is a city bordering Toronto), in 1994, to move to Albuquerque, I suffered an extreme case of culture shock. Gone were the Tim Horton donut shops (if someone claims to be Canadian, ask them if they like “timbits” and if they don’t have a clue, they’re NOT Canadian).

"Timbits" at Tim Horton's Donut Shops. If you have to ask, you're not Canadian! (Photo Credit: www.todaysfreestuff.ca)

“Timbits” at Tim Horton’s Donut Shops. If you have to ask, you’re not Canadian! (Photo Credit: http://www.todaysfreestuff.ca)

Gone was Swiss Chalet barbequed chicken and Harvey’s freshly grilled hamburgers. Gone were cheese curds and pea meal bacon (you know, “Canadian” bacon). No Nanaimo Bars or Butter Tarts in Albuquerque bakeries. No fresh fiddleheads for the picking in early spring. No going into the local bar (not the Nanaimo Bar) and asking for a “CC and ginger”.

If you don't know what "CC and ginger" is, you're most certainly NOT Canadian!

If you don’t know what “CC and ginger” is, you’re most certainly NOT Canadian!

It was heartbreaking and took some adjusting to. (if you have to ask what “CC” is, you’re most certainly un-Canadian!)

Butter Tarts are a distinctively Canadian treat and you can find them in almost any bakery across Canada. Even the large grocery chains have their own, watered down insipid versions. If you can’t wander into a grocery store or a bakery and find Butter Tarts, well, I don’t think we’re in Canada anymore, eh, Toto? I have many recipes for Butter Tarts in my collection of recipes and cookbooks, but I present one here for your delight, from a true Canadian cookbook: “The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book”, published in 1966.

The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book, 1966

The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book, 1966

Canadian Butter Tarts (Photo Credit: www.foodnetwork.ca)

Canadian Butter Tarts (Photo Credit: http://www.foodnetwork.ca)

Now, for those of you, who don’t know who Laura Secord was, she didn’t make chocolates, although she has a chocolate manufacturing company named after her (Laura Secord Chocolates, eh?) Ms. Secord was a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812. She walked 20 miles out of American occupied territory in 1813 to alert the British of an impending American attack (why are Americans always picking on Canadians? I know, because we’re there!)

So, here is the recipe for Butter Tarts from
The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book

Butter Tarts

(makes 15, but better make a double batch, as you can’t eat just one)

Note: to prevent them from bubbling over, stir as little as possible

Prepare sufficient pastry to line 15 medium sized muffin cups. Do not prick the pastry. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

Pour boiling water over ½ cup raisins (currants may be substituted, but they’re not as tasty and certainly not “original”)

Let stand 5 minutes and drain.

Stir together:

¼ cup soft butter
½ cup lightly packed brown sugar

Blend in

1 cup corn syrup
2 slightly beaten eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon lemon juice

Stir in drained raisins and fill pastry lined muffin cups 2/3 full. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until pastry is golden. Do not allow filling to bubble.

Eat several and then go and floss, eh?

Footnote: Only in Canada, eh? Pity” was the slogan for the Red Rose Tea company, started in 1894 in Saint John, New Brunswick. For many years, the tea was available only in Canada.

These are probably American tourists. Canadians don't dress this way in public. (Photo Credit: www.travelweek.ca)

These are probably American tourists. Canadians don’t dress this way in public. (Photo Credit: http://www.travelweek.ca)

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