Venturesome Vegan Victuals

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Music – “I Can Eat It All [A Music Video]” from Remotely Controlled by Mark Lowry. Released: 1996

I have always been curious about “vegans” and what they eat. The notion of being vegetarian is pretty clear, but “vegan” seems to be shrouded in mystery to me. For those who read my posts religiously, you might recall my January 14th, 2014 post “Any Locavore, Freegan, Flexitarians out There?”  In my cookbook collection, I have numerous vegetarian cookbooks, and a few vegan cookbooks including “Vegan World Fusion Cuisine“, “The Candle Cafe Cookbook“, “How it all Vegan!” and “La Dolce Vegan!”

My understanding is that a vegetarian eats no meat, fish or poultry. A lacto-ovo vegetarian eats vegetables, eggs, and dairy products but not meat.  A lacto vegetarian does not consume meat and eggs, but will eat dairy products.

"Faux eggs" (Photo Credit: www.sporkorfoon.com)

“Faux eggs” (Photo Credit: http://www.sporkorfoon.com)

 

 

A vegan, however, does not consume nor use in any fashion, any animal based products, which would include not only the flesh of animals, but products such as milk, honey, eggs, caviar (who could afford it anyhow?!), animal hides and the like.

The Vegan Society, in 1979, amended their definition of veganism as:

“A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.”

Now, I haven't seen the video, but this doesn't sound like a very nice thing to do! (Photo Credit: www.youtube.com)

Now, I haven’t seen the video, but this doesn’t sound like a very nice thing to do! (Photo Credit: http://www.youtube.com)

I find it an admirable aspiration, however, one that, although I deplore animal cruelty and contribute to several animal support groups and charitable organizations, and although I enjoy vegetables, I have never been able to make the leap from an omnivorous diet to a vegetarian or vegan one. Mind you, I haven’t tried very hard either. Old habits are hard to change.

But, what is most peculiar to me is that there are so many recipes in cookbooks and on the internet, for vegan meals, yet many of them seem to want to “emulate” the very products they eschew! For example, why eat “mock chicken” or faux “steak” or “fish” if you wouldn’t consider eating a real chicken, a piece of beef or a fish?

"Fake cheeseburger" (Photo Credit: www.meettheshannons.com)

“Fake cheeseburger”  (Photo Credit: http://www.meetthe shannons.com)

"Faux sausage pizza" Does Papa John serve this? (Photo Credit: www.thatwasvegan.com)

“Faux sausage pizza” Does Papa John’s serve this? (Photo Credit: http://www.thatwas vegan.com)

"Faux steak" (Photo Credit: www.pinterest.com)

“Faux steak” (Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest. com)

"Mock Chicken Salad" Why simulate something you don't want to eat anyhow? (Photo Credit: www.downtoearth.org)

“Mock Chicken Salad” Why simulate something you don’t want to eat anyhow? (Photo Credit: http://www.downto earth.org)

Why eat products that resemble eggs, or ham, yet aren’t? Why would a vegan want to partake of “sausages” or “cheeseburgers”, or “meatloaf”, made from vegetable sources, but resemble their real animal counterparts?

"Faux sausages" (Photo Credit: www.pinterest.com)

“Faux sausages” (Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest.com)

"Faux fried chicken" (I'll bet you can't get this at KFC!) (Photo Credit: www.hellyeahitsvegan.com)

“Faux fried chicken” (I’ll bet you can’t get this at KFC!) (Photo Credit: http://www.hellyeah itsvegan.com)

 

 

Could it be that some vegans are really closet carnivores, but won’t admit it, or are easing themselves into veganism from their lurid carnivorous past?

"Faux chicken soup" Is it still good for colds, even if it has no chicken in it? (Photo Credit: www.thecomfortingvegan.com)

“Faux chicken soup” Is it still good for colds, even if it has no chicken in it? (Photo Credit: http://www.thecomforting vegan.com)

"Faux meatloaf" (Photo Credit: www.avirtualvegan.com)

“Faux meatloaf” (Photo Credit: http://www.avirtual vegan.com)

 

And, for the Scottish in you, fake Haggis! (Photo Credit: www.vegnews.com)

And, for the Scottish in you, fake Haggis! (Photo Credit: http://www.vegnews.com)

 

 

 

 

 

I welcome comments from readers to assist me in explaining this odd conundrum. After all, if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it must be a duck, right? But not necessarily so, in the world of veganism!

If it walks like a turkey, gobbles like a turkey, it must be a turkey, right? Not necessarily! (Photo Credit: www.archives.quarrygirl.com)

If it looks like a turkey, walks like a turkey, and gobbles like a turkey, it must be a turkey, right? Not necessarily! (Photo Credit: http://www.archives. quarrygirl.com)

Could this lady really be a cheating vegan? (Photo Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk)

Could this lady really be a cheating vegan? (Photo Credit: http://www.dailymail.    co.uk)


My EatYourBooks cookbook collection

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About vintagecookbookery

Cookbook lover and collector with a burgeoning collection of cookbooks. Reading and researching food trends, history of cooking techniques and technological advances in cooking, what we eat and why and cookbooks as reflectors of cultures is a fascination for me. As of November 7th, 2013, I hold the current Guinness World Record title for the largest collection of cookbooks: 2,970 at the official count on July 14th, 2013 (applaud now, thank you very much!) The current (unofficial) number is now 5,851. What next? More cookbooks, naturally (small ones !)
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